What is Seroquel Prescribed For?

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Seroquel is the marketing brand name of the drug quetiapine originally given by pharmaceutical giant AstraZeneca. It was first approved by the US Food & Drug Administration in 1997. It is available in both brand name and as a more inexpensive generic.

The FDA gives Seroquel a C pregnancy rating. This means that "Animal reproduction studies have shown an adverse effect on the fetus and there are no adequate and well-controlled studies in humans, but potential benefits may warrant use of the drug in pregnant women despite potential risk."

Seroquel FDA Approved Indications

To address the question of what is Seroquel prescribed for, we can refer to the FDA's full prescribing information for the drug. According to the FDA, Seroquel has four indications/usages:

Schizophrenia
- For the treatment of schizophrenia in adults and adolescents.

Bipolar Disorder
- For the acute treatment of manic episodes associated with bipolar I disorder, both as monotherapy and as an adjunct to lithium or divalproex.

- As monotherapy for the acute treatment of depressive episodes associated with bipolar I and bipolar II disorders in adults.

- For the maintenance treatment of bipolar I disorder, as an adjunct to lithium or divalproex, in adult patients.

Seroquel may also be prescribed off-label for other conditions not listed here.

Dispensed Strengths

Seroquel is dispensed in six strengths, all in tablet form:
25 mg | 50 mg | 100 mg | 200 mg | 300 mg | 400 mg

Warnings

Elderly patients are at an increased risk of death from an antipsychotic drug like Seroquel if they are already diagnosed with dementia-related psychosis.

In children, adolescents and young adults there is an increased risk of suicidality—suicidal thinking and/or behavior.

 
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